Beginner’s guide to netmaking, Part 1

Why would you want to make a net anyway? Well, there are loads of reasons. You might want to tie down a load on the back of a small trailer. You could make a net grocery bag. You could rig up a sling for all those pesky teddy bears and other soft toys so that you can put them all in their own communal hammock suspended from a couple of ceiling hooks. Or, like one of our readers, you might want to make a particular kind of net so you can catch rabbits. Not sure whether I totally approve of that or not. Each to his own, I guess. Although I can’t promise any recipes for bunny stew on these pages. Sorry 😦

The simple (hopefully, easy to follow) tutorials on this blog will show the basic steps of netmaking. You might want to use thinner cordage, more or fewer meshes etc, Adapt my instructions to your own requirements.

To begin, you will need some netting needles. These are available in lots of places (a quick online search should do the trick) and various sizes. If you’re not sure what size you’ll need, buy an assortment and experiment with them. Here are mine:
netneedles

Then you will need whatever cordage might be best for your needs. Nets can be made from knitting yarn, embroidery thread, jute twine and probably even from wire. Take your pick.

Here’s how to load your netting needle with the cordage of your choice:

First make a slip knot.

slipknot

Hook the slip knot over the ‘tongue’ of the needle and pull it closed.

slipknot2

Bring the cordage (let’s call it ‘twine’ from her on, shall we?) down to the bottom of the needle.

netneedle1
Then turn the needle to view its other side…

netneedle2

 

…and bring the twine up…

netneedle5

 

…and loop it round the tongue of the needle once again.

netneedle3
Then bring the twine down to the bottom of the needle once more, before turning and repeating all the previous steps.

netneedle4

 

Here’s what the needle will look like when it’s full. You’re almost ready to start making nets πŸ™‚
loadnetneedle7

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8 Comments Add yours

  1. MrsCraft says:

    I’m really intrigued by this now! Can’t wait to read more. 😊

  2. Well, your beginning photos have already surprised me, as I hadn’t imagined the needle would be loaded up the way you’ve done – it’s good to learn something new!

    Now all I have to do is cajole Mr Night Owl into wanting to make his own net items, instead of wanting me to do it! Lol

    BTW, he has decided to retire from bunny hunting, due to the arthritis playing him up something chronic, but was intrigued to learn that net-making could involve making hammocks!

    He reckons, if he can get string strong enough, he (or I) can make a hammock, to enjoy all this wonderful summer weather (although I think that last bit was sarcasm) Lol

    1. Chris says:

      Our netting tutorials should keep Mr Night Owl very busy. In fact, he may need his very own workshop to accommodate all these new projects. πŸ™‚

      1. Don’t give him ideas!
        He’s already talking about wanting another garden shed so he can move all the stuff he’s storing in the one we’ve got – I think he’s planning on making a man-cave! Lol

        1. Chris says:

          Coming soon on the Craftshack: How to decorate your mancave πŸ™‚

          1. Lol
            You’re determined to encourage Mr Night Owl, aren’t you?

  3. Chris says:

    @MrsCraft: Busy working on pictures for the next couple of parts in the series. Stay tuned πŸ™‚

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